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Fysikuppslaget.jpg

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Fysikuppslaget b.jpg

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LED there be light

 

The inventors of the blue diod was awarded with the Nobel Prize in Physics 2014. The blue light in itself isn't that useful, but the fact that you can combine it with the existing red and green diods is, becuse then you can create white light. The LED light was born and is currently taking over as our prime source of illuminating stuff.

 

Forskning & Framsteg

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Öringens_sinnen_b.jpg

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Fishy how they make it home

 

Trout in the baltic are combining all their senses to find their way back to the rivers where they were born. And they recognise their home water by tasting it through their skin!

 

Forskning & Framsteg

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Ligons.jpg

Ligons.jpg
Ligons.jpg

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Catching the waves

 

Gravitational waves are one of the greatest predictions of Einstein's theory of general relativity.

Massive objects bend spacetime, and the curvature of spacetime tells objects how to move.

Gravitational waves are ripples in the curvature of 

spacetime and they travel outward from the source, which could be black holes or big neutron stars that circle each other. To detect the waves, and so prove their existence, the large LIGO facilities were built. This is how they work.

 

Forskning & Framsteg

 

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CELLULOSA.jpg

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Paper stronger than steel

 

Cellulose nano fibers can now be mixed in a new way to create extremely strong, cheap and light materials (not to mention the fascinating fact that you could make a paper bag that never rips open in your hand half way home from the groscery store).

 

Forskning & Framsteg

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FORMEL E.jpg

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FORMEL E C.jpg

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Formel e B.jpg

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FORMEL E.jpg

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F1 grows a conscience

 

Cellulose nano fibers can now be mixed in a new way to create extremely strong, cheap and light materials (not to mention the fascinating fact that you could make a paper bag that never rips open in your hand half way home from the groscery store).

 

Forskning & Framsteg

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medicin 2013 fof.jpg

medicin 2013 fof.jpg
medicin 2013 fof.jpg

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Heavy traffic at a
whole other level 

 

The logistics of loading and shipping substances within cells are quite intricate. Thanks to the Nobel Prize laureates in Physiology or Medicin 2013 we now know how it's done. This is my illustration of the process.

 

Forskning & Framsteg

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sagittarius.png

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KECK.png

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VLT.png

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sagittarius.png

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A dark abyss in the centre
of the Milky Way

 

By watching the stars  in the centre of the Milky Way for a very long time from observatories in both Hawaii and Chile, scientists could conclude that the star S2 must be orbiting a black hole. The brilliance of the discovery (and the patience) was rewarded with the Crafoord Prize in 2012.

 

The Crafoord Prize/Royal Swedish Academy

of Sciences

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Fly like a whale

 

Flying whales is not a common sight, even though the acrobatic Humpback Whale can throw most of its 40 tons above the surface (except the tail fin) in spectacular jumps. They are fast swimmers, mainly because of small lumps on their fins that cut through the whirls forming around and slowing down moving objects in water. German scientists have recently managed to copy the small lumps and put them on helicopter rotor blades. The structure solves an old problem for the pilots – at high speed or in certain windy conditions so called dynamic stall may occur. To prevent critical damage to the rotor, the pilot has to slow down. With the wale lumps on the blades they can fly both faster and safer.

 

Forskning & Framsteg

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Hallandsåsens.jpg

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Hallandsåsens.jpg

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Coming through!

 

After what seemed like an eternity the great tunnel bore broke through Hallandsåsen in the south of Sweden. After twenty years of hard work, 12 billions of SEK invested and at a high environmental cost, train passengers between Malmö and Gothenburg now gaine a staggering 10 minutes on the trip.

The rock is among the most difficult in the world, fragmented with lots of water in the cracks. Some areas had to be frozen down before they could be bored.

 

Forskning & Framsteg

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AA fallucka.jpg

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W fallucka.jpg

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AA fallucka.jpg

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New method will
stop speeders

 

Flying whales are not a common sight, even though the acrobatic Humpback Whale can throw almost its whole 40 ton body above the surface in spectacular jumps. German scientists have recently managed to copy the small lumps on the Humpbacks majestic fins, and put them on helicopter rotor blades. The structure prevents stalling and allow the helicopter fly faster.

 

Forskning & Framsteg

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Teknik Isbrytare NY_edited.jpg

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W Teknik Isbrytare NY.jpg

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Teknik Isbrytare NY_edited.jpg

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Breaking the ice sideways 

 

The Baltika has a unique asymmetric hull that will let her swing round and break ice at an angle of 30 degrees. Hence, instead of two vessels carving the ice only one will be needed. The Baltika can open a channel 50 metres wide – enough for large container ships to follow.

 

Forskning & Framsteg

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3D solutions gets more sophisticated

 

This graphic show the technique behind the Nintendo 3Ds back in 2011, when Nintendo used a parallax barrier to create a 3D experience for the

gamers.

 

Forskning & Framsteg

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Älven A.jpg

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Älven B.jpg

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Älven D.jpg

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Threatened riverside fauna

 

The greatest species richness in the swedish landscape is found by and in the river rapids of the north. These biotopes are threatened by hydro expansion and the relentless raising and lowering of the water level (in turn driven by the energy market). This illustration show some of the species and where they grow and live.

 

Forskning & Framsteg